The Poetry Friday Anthology for Celebrations: Holiday Poems for the Whole Year in English and Spanish

The Poetry Friday Anthology for Celebrations: Holiday Poems for the Whole Year in English and Spanish
Compiled by Sylvia Vardell and Janet Wong (Author)

Booktalk: Celebrate all year long with The Poetry Friday Anthology for Celebrations—156 poems in English and SPANISH ideal for preK – grade 6. Here is an snippet from Spring by Jane Lichtenberger Patton …

Snippet:
The earth’s in bloom,
new life’s begun.
Spring’s finally sprung . . . at last!

This week’s Poetry Friday Round-up is hosted by Check it Out.

Copyright © 2015 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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Mr Strike Out

Mr. Strike Out by Anastasia Suen (writing as Jake Maddox)

A baseball novel

David Gray is notorious in his baseball league, notorious for striking out, both as a pitcher and a batter. He spends so much time practicing his pitching, he has never honed his batting skills. After learning about the great Babe Ruth, David becomes determined to be a better all-around player, which means he’ll have to learn how to bat. With some help from a teammate, David hopes to never hear the words “Mr. Strike Out” again.

  • Copyright: 2007
  • Guided Reading level: J
  • Lexile Level: 380L
  • ATOS Level: 2.7
  • AR Quiz Number: 109968
  • Library Binding / Paperback: 72 pages
  • Publisher: Stone Arch Books

Book Activities:

Play Math Baseball (If your answer is correct, you will get a hit!)

Explore the Science of Baseball. Test your baseball reaction time, learn how to throw a curveball and how to find the “sweet spot” on a bat.

At Teachers Corner, you can print baseball journal pages, and create your own baseball crossword, word search or word scramble pages.

Find out what happened Today in Baseball History.

Copyright © 2014 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum

How was the invention of bubble gum engineered? Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum by Meghan McCarthy (ATOS 4.8 / AD740L)

Pop! : the invention of bubble gum

Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “How was the invention of bubble gum engineered?” They will review the steps engineers take when they explore a solution to a problem. They will then determine the steps Walter Diemer took to create bubblegum after listening to the text of the book and apply and explain his ideas and actions to the way an engineer works to solve a problem. They will present their information and discuss their finding in a large group.

TeachingSTEM.medThe Library Activity begins on page 154. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 155.

Extension Activities(sample)

1. Have the students make a number line with markings to eighths on a sentence strip or sheet of paper. Hold a bubble gum blowing contest. Put their bubble on the number line and measure it from the part of the bubble that actually touches the paper (to get the most accurate measure). Compare and announce the winner.

2. Determine the mean, median, and average for the class.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a engineer.. I know that _________.”

You can find more Teaching STEM lesson plans on the Teaching STEM blog

Copyright © 2014 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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Forces and Motion at Work

What makes forces and motions on Earth? Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Forces and Motion at Work by Shirley Duke (GRL W / ATOS 5.2)

Forces and motion at work

Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “What makes forces and motions on Earth?” by researching information from a variety of sources relating to the vocabulary of forces and motion. They will summarize their information and then reduce their facts into a short statement of less than one hundred and forty characters in a style suitable for Twitter. From an assigned list of words, each group of students will use print and online information to define their word, read about it to identify and comprehend the scientific principle, and collect facts relating to that principle. The groups will narrow the information by wording it in a phrase or sentence that fits Twitter’s parameters. They will share their information in the library in a way that is accessible for the available technology there or in a class PowerPoint presentation designed to look like a tweet on Twitter.

TeachingSTEM.medThe Library Activity begins on page 76. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 78.

Extension Activities (sample)

1. Make a class Wiki and put their information on it.

2. Do a podcast about the vocabulary by writing the script in their groups and recording the information. Compare this method of communicating to other means of communicating.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a technology specialist.. I know that _________.”

You can find more Teaching STEM lesson plans on the Teaching STEM blog

Copyright © 2014 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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High-Tech Olympics

What are Olympic distances really like? Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: High-Tech Olympics by Nick Hunter (ATOS 6.4 / 970L)

High-Tech Olympics

Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “What are Olympic distances really like?” Students will be grouped into five teams and given an identifying number or name. They will use an Olympic record database to locate distances, lengths, or heights of sports in the track and field events and record them. Then they will measure the equivalent distance in the library, classroom, or hallways and mark the distance with a sticky note to show the measurement. They will compare their results and discuss them.

TeachingSTEM.medThe Library Activity begins on page 84. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 86.

Extension Activities (sample)

1. Have the students use their metric conversions and change them to standard units. Add another set of columns to the graphic organizer if you choose. Or have them use a metric calculator online (http://www.conversion-metric.org/).

2. Pre-write the distances or heights on the graphic organizer for the students to measure in the library and halls.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a technology specialist. I know that _________.”

You can find more Teaching STEM lesson plans on the Teaching STEM blog

Copyright © 2014 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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Teaching STEM: Man on the Moon

How have astronauts and space travel changed since the early space program? Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Man on the Moon by Anastasia Suen (ATOS 2.2 / NC860L)

Man on the moon

Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “How have astronauts and space travel changed since the early space program?” As they listen to the book, students will notice what equipment and items astronauts use and think about how images in a book contribute to a better understanding of the text. They will view images from the current space program and compare the changes they see in them to the space program in its early days. Using a picture from the text, students will describe the sensations that might result from a splash down and then discuss the changes they have learned taking place in the space program by writing about them or comparing them in a discussion.

TeachingSTEM.medThe Library Activity begins on page 92. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 96.

Extension Activities (sample)

1. Choose an astronaut listed on the NASA website Have the students read about an astronaut and report on that person.

2. Teach a lesson on phases of the moon.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a technology specialist.. I know that _________.”

You can find more Teaching STEM lesson plans on the Teaching STEM blog

Copyright © 2014 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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Build It

What keeps a bridge from falling down? Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Build It! by Tammy Enz (GRL Q / G740L)

Build it : invent new structures and contraptions

Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “What keeps a bridge from falling down?” In groups, students will search for and locate information related to the four major kinds of bridge supports— beams, arches, trusses, and suspension. They will complete a graphic organizer to explain how each of the four supports work to hold up bridges. Then they will use toothpicks or Popsicle sticks to practice forming arches or trusses and use that knowledge to plan and draw a design for a bridge of their own for their group.

TeachingSTEM.medThe Library Activity begins on page 130. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 132.

Extension Activities(sample)

1. Have the students do an interactive bridge building activity from PBS.

2. Investigate a cantilever bridge support and compare it with the BATS supports.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a engineer.. I know that _________.”

You can find more Teaching STEM lesson plans on the Teaching STEM blog

Copyright © 2014 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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Multimedia Artist and Animator

How can technology be used to create art? Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Multimedia Artist and Animator by Matt Mullins (ATOS 4.9 690L)
Multimedia artist and animator

Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “How can technology be used to create art?” They will work as individuals or in pairs to explore using an image as their canvas and adding features that will become animated after completing their creation to their satisfaction. They will explain their choices by discussing them and then writing about them on a graphic organizer. They will then relate this activity to a job using art or animation. The students or pairs will save their work for the librarian to print.

TeachingSTEM.medThe Library Activity begins on page 104. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 106.

Extension Activities (sample)

1. Turn the art they created into a four comic panel and include text to go with it.

2. Have the students design a book cover that they might like their favorite book to have in place of the current one.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a technology specialist. I know that _________.”

You can find more Teaching STEM lesson plans on the Teaching STEM blog

Copyright © 2014 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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Amazing Amusement Park Rides

What information is needed to design a roller coaster? Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Amazing Amusement Park Rides by Meish Goldish (ATOS 4.9 / IG880L)

Amazing Amusement Park Rides

Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “What information is needed to design a roller coaster?” They will write down the statistics of the Steel Dragon coaster and then add their own statistics about a roller coaster they will design on the graphic organizer. Using the statistics, they will design and draw a roller coaster track and car as a prototype for an amusement park ride lasting two to three minutes. They will plan first on paper and decide on their statistics, which they will put on their graphic organizer. Then they will transfer their design ideas to the large drawing paper and label all the required statistics. Students will share their roller coaster designs with the class.

TeachingSTEM.medThe Library Activity begins on page 122. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 124.

Extension Activities(sample)

1. Look at pages 16–17 from the book. Use “The Crypt” ride to calculate the money that could be brought in for that ride using the assignment’s requirements, times, and fees.

2. Write a personal experience story about one of their favorite roller coasters.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a engineer.. I know that _________.”

You can find more Teaching STEM lesson plans on the Teaching STEM blog

Copyright © 2014 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.
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